Which Arc Welding Process is the Most Efficient?

This question can be answered very quickly.  Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) and Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) can have 98-99% deposition efficiency.  However, the question is a bit more complicated since when we talk about efficiency we don’t just care about deposition efficiency (how much of the electrode becomes weld metal).  What we care about is how quickly we can apply the weld metal.

Because of this, the answer to this question is “it depends.”  It depends on the application and its requirements.

First, let’s look strictly at deposition efficiency of different types of electrodes:

SMAW (stick) – 60 – 65%

FCAW-G (flux-cored gas shielded) – 82 – 88%

FCAW-SS (flux-cored self-shielded) – 75 – 85%

GMAW (mig) – 92 – 99%

SAW (submerged arc) – 99% (does not include flux)

MCAW (metal-core) – 94-98%

GTAW (tig) – 94-97%

 

At first glance you may assume that SMAW is the worst in terms of efficiency. This is true of its depositions efficiency.  For every pound of stick electrode that you buy only about two thirds of it become weld metal,. The rest is stub loss and slag.  On top of that SMAW is a true manual process, meaning there is no automatic feeding of the electrode.  This makes SMAW a very inefficient process.  However, there are cases where the ability to change electrode types and diameters quickly can increase efficiency.   SMAW is typically most efficient in maintenance and in some outdoor applications where it becomes difficult to haul around cylinders of gas and/or portable wire feeders.

Shielding metal arc welding has very low electrode efficiency but it is a very versatile process which comes in handy when flexibility is required.

Shielding metal arc welding has very low electrode efficiency but it is a very versatile process which comes in handy when flexibility is required.

 

GMAW and MCAW appear to be the best and they are as long as we are welding in the flat or horizontal positions for fillet welds or flat positions for grooves.  With deposition rates exceeding 15 pounds per hour with 1/16” diameter wire this process is extremely efficient.  However, if you take it out of position and weld vertical up or overhead you are forced to reduce that deposition rate to something closer to 5 pounds per hour.  If you then switch to FCAW you can get close to 10 pounds per hour deposition rate with the right electrode.  There are FCAW wires that are specifically designed to run out of position.

Gas metal arc welding is the most popular arc welding process in manufacturing facilities. It's high electrode efficiency and ability to deposit metal at a high rate make it a very attractive process for high productivity environments.

Gas metal arc welding is the most popular arc welding process in manufacturing facilities. It’s high electrode efficiency and ability to deposit metal at a high rate make it a very attractive process for high productivity environments.

SAW has the highest electrode efficiency and in long, flat, straight joints it will be the most efficient.  But again, you are limited to flat and horizontal positions.

Submerged arc welding is capable of depositing welding metal at over 20 pounds per hours with a single electrode. However, it is limited to the flat and horizontal positions only.

Submerged arc welding is capable of depositing welding metal at over 20 pounds per hours with a single electrode. However, it is limited to the flat and horizontal positions only.

GTAW is very efficient but as you probably already know it can be excruciatingly slow.

Always keep in mind that the most economical process is that which has the lowest cost per foot of welded joint.  So the efficiency of the electrode is only one component.  Other factors that affect the cost per foot of weld are:

  • Cost of electrode
  • Cost of labor/time to weld including slag removal (if any)
  • Rework (some processes are more susceptible to weld discontinuities and defects)
  • Joint preparation required (i.e. GTAW requires perfectly clean joints where SMAW does not)
  • Welder skill

What process do you use the most?  Do you believe it is the most efficient for your particular application?

Reference: The Procedure Handbook of Arc Welding – 14th Edition

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